27 January, 2021

“The Smell Of Blood Lingers For Days”

An army officer who was part of a team that conducted one of the recent ‘hot pursuits’ into Myanmar on how such counter-insurgency ops actually take place

Photograph by AP
“The Smell Of Blood Lingers For Days”
outlookindia.com
2016-10-25T17:20:20+05:30

An army officer who was part of a team that conducted one of the recent ‘hot pursuits’ into Myanmar, spoke to Outlook on condition of anonymity.

Did you conduct surgical strikes inside Myanmar?

I did.  I personally took down 21 militants.

But there is so much ambiguity about whether Indian soldiers actually went inside Myanmar.

(Looks at his companions at the camp and exchanges glances, smiles.) We know what we did. I will go on record if you can get the top authorities to agree. But unless you can do that I will hide behind anonymity.

Why is it shrouded in so much secrecy?

For obvious reasons. It took place inside the territory of another sovereign nation. However, it happened with its consent—from the highest authorities.

Please describe the procedure.

There was not one. It is ongoing.... There is planning. Pre-dawn surprise strikes work best because the enemy is at its most vulnerable. They are off-guard. In one strike I...

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