26 September, 2020

Amid Outrage Over Citizenship Bill, Signs Of ULFA's Revival

There are unconfirmed reports of dozens of youngsters joining ULFA, underscoring fears that the militant organisation, alm­ost written off as dead and gone, is showing signs of revival in Assam.

War Weary
Sabitya Baishya shows a photo of her son Dhanjit who joined the ULFA in September
Photograph by Manash Das
Amid Outrage Over Citizenship Bill, Signs Of ULFA's Revival
outlookindia.com
2018-11-26T17:07:54+05:30

On a cool September morning, Dhanjeet Baishya went out to meet his friends in his village on the foothills of the eastern Himalayas close to the Indo-Bhutan border in Assam’s Udalguri district. That was the last time Sabitya Baishya saw her 24-year-old son. A few weeks ago, words reached the village that Dhanjit has joined the United Liberation Front of Asom-Independent (ULFA-I), waging an armed war for Assa­m’s secession from India.

At the birthplace of the militant organisation in Tinsukia district, hundreds of miles east of Udalguri, ULFA commander-in-chief Paresh Barua’s nephew, Munna Barua, 24, also joined the outfit, this November. In between, at least 15 youngsters are confirmed to have joined the banned outfit and are now said to be in ULFA’s camps in Myanmar. Among these new recruits is a Class X student, Karishma Mech of Tinsukia district. There are unconfirmed reports of dozens of others joining ULFA, underscoring fears that the militant organisation, alm­ost written off as dead and gone, is showing signs of revival. This also...

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