20 October, 2020

Pulsing It Strong

Indian food has cracked the code of mixing cereals and pulses in the right proportion to create plant protein combos that are easy to assimilate.

Illustration by Saahil
Pulsing It Strong
outlookindia.com
-0001-11-30T00:00:00+05:53

Alright, the price of pulses is soaring; dal is no longer the ghar ki murgi, for she is now Rs 200 a kilo. Surely raids on hoarders will bring the prices down, but the real issue here is that we are no longer growing as much of pulses as we used to. To encourage cultivation of pulses and legumes all around the world, especially in the developing world, the UN FAO (Food and Agricultural Organisation) has declared 2016 as the ‘Year of Pulses’.

Pulses, as we all know, are a great source of minerals, fibre and amino acids. The trick is to mix them with cereals, and we have a complete source of proteins. So whether its regular food like dal chawal, khichdi, idli or delicacies like puran poli and dal kachori or even street food like missal and vada pav—Indian food has cracked the code of mixing cereals and pulses in the right proportion to create plant protein combos that are easy to assimilate and high on biological value.

The United Nations says that it’s plant protein that the world needs to counter the double burden of malnourishment. Obesity...

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